January 18, 2018

AP Runs Interference for Washington Governor Inslee’s Punitive, Ever-Increasing Carbon Tax

Dedicated tax-and-spend liberals often get help from the press in describing their plans to raid constituents’ pocketbooks in vague terms, while nobly describing the alleged benefits of their plans to use the money. Washington’s Democratic Governor Jay Inslee has the Associated Press running that kind of interference for his carbon tax.

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De Blasio’s Morning Joe Howler: We’ll Restore Decrepit Subways by Taxing the Rich

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 5:15 pm

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio played make-believe during his Wednesday Morning Joe appearance, and everyone else present let him do so without challenge. Hizzoner’s deepest dive into fantasyland was his contention that he can raise the money needed to repair and improve Gotham’s decrepit subway system by “taxing millionaires and billionaires,” which would only raise about 5 percent of the money needed.

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Thursday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (011818)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: Pro-life bill would eliminate vast majority of legal abortions in Poland

Filed under: Life-Based News,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 5:55 am

From Warsaw, Poland:

Jan 15, 2018 / 12:46 pm

Lawmakers in Poland proposed pro-life legislation last week that would outlaw abortions performed because of a congenital disorder or deformity in the unborn child.

Members of parliament shot down a “Save Women” bill Jan. 10 that would have liberalized abortion access, allowing abortion through the first trimester of pregnancy and opening access to emergency contraception.

Instead, the country’s lawmakers promoted the “Stop Abortion” bill that would ban abortion for pregnancies in which the baby had received a congenital disorder diagnosis or deformity.

The new proposal, if passed, could eliminate the majority of abortions legally performed in Poland. According to Deutsche Welle, around 1,100 legal abortions took place in 2016. Of these abortions, 1,042 took place because the child was deformed.

“We have come to parliament today because we don’t want hospitals turning into abattoirs,” said Kaja Godek of the Life and Family Foundation, who introduced the bill to parliament, according to The Guardian.

Abortion in Poland is legal in Poland only in cases of rape or incest, if the mother’s health is threatened, or if the baby has received a fatal diagnosis or deformity. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

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January 17, 2018

Positivity: Trump to address March for Life via livestream

Filed under: Life-Based News,Taxes & Government — Tom @ 5:21 pm

From Washington:

Jan 17, 2018 / 01:50 pm

U.S. President Donald Trump will address participants in the 45th national March for Life via live video, the White House confirmed Wednesday.

The march, held annually on or near the anniversary of the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, recognizes the lives lost since abortion became legal nationwide and celebrates the dignity of every human life.

The march typically draws crowds of several hundred thousand from across the country. It includes a rally with speakers and live music. This year, the theme of the march is “Love Saves Lives.”

Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush addressed the March for Life while in office via telephone or remote loudspeaker. Trump will be the first sitting president to address the march via live video. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

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CNN’s Romans Hides Dow’s 2 Years of Pre-Presidential Election Flatness

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 26,000 for the first time on Wednesday. When it first jumped the 26,000 hurdle during Tuesday’s trading, only to fall back at the close, CNN’s Christine Romans somewhat surprisingly noted it. But as she did, she positively and erroneously spun the market’s awful pre-presidential election history in a way that even some conservatives have ignorantly come to accept.

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Wednesday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (011718)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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January 16, 2018

No Anthem Kneelers Are on Remaining NFL Playoff Teams; NBC Hardest Hit?

On Monday, Valerie Richardson at the Washington Times noted that no teams with players who continued to kneel during the National Anthem before National Football League games until the end of the regular season qualified for the playoffs. A sports psychologist sees a potentially important lesson in this result, while NBC, which has promised to showcase kneeling players during the Anthem before the beginning of this year’s Super Bowl, may be destined for disappointment.

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Cynical Scribes Continue to Downplay Tax Cut-Driven Good News

Reporters continue to concoct reasons to complain as more than 2 million American individuals and their families have suddenly become better off than they were three weeks ago. Even the news that the nation’s largest retailer is raising its nationwide minimum wage while paying bonuses of up to $1,000 to every employee, and that an automaker is investing $1 billion in U.S. production, haven’t moved cynics who refuse to concede the unconditional positivity in all of this.

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Tuesday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (011618)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: Vikings QB calls miraculous touchdown pass only third-best moment of his life

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

At The Blaze (video at link):

January 15, 2018

The heart-pounding NFC divisional playoff game Sunday night between the Minnesota Vikings and the visiting New Orleans Saints will be remembered for a long time.

The Saints came all the way back from a 17-point deficit to take a 21-20 lead with three minutes left. The Vikings stormed back with a 53-yard field goal with 1:29 remaining to retake the lead, 23-21. Then the Saints answered that by marching down the gridiron and getting their own field goal, a 43-yarder, to grab back the lead, 24-23. Time left on the clock? Just 29 seconds.

After taking the field for the final time, the Vikings offense faced a third and 10 from their own 39-yard line with just seconds remaining and no time outs. ESPN’s win-probability model gave them only a 2.6 percent chance to win.

Then they pulled off what they’re already calling the Minnesota Miracle.

Quarterback Case Keenum fired a long sideline pass toward Stefon Diggs, who came down with the desperate throw. And after a Saints player missed the tackle, there was no one between Diggs and the end zone — and he romped right in as time expired.

The Vikings advanced to play the Philadelphia Eagles in next week’s NFC Championship.

After the game, an understandably thrilled Keenum told an interviewer that the miraculous win “probably will go down as the third-best moment of my life.”

And what topped his squad’s stunning victory?

“Giving my life to Jesus Christ and marrying my wife,” Keenum said as the ecstatic hometown crowd roared all around him. …

Go here for the rest of the story.

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January 15, 2018

This Is Why the Concept of Papal Infallibility Has Specific Limits

Though the press likes to pretend that papal infallibility exists on everything that comes out of the Pope’s mouth (when they like it; when they don’t, they just pretend he never said it), its application is limited to spiritual matters relating to church dogma and individual salvation. It’s not relevant to political or scientific disputes.

Here’s an example of why this understanding is so important (HT Weasel Zippers):

Pope Francis: Fears of Mass Migration Are ‘Legitimate’ and ‘Fully Comprehensible’

In a nuanced address Sunday for the World Day of Migrants and Refugees, Pope Francis seemed to walk back earlier statements denouncing “xenophobia,” acknowledging instead that fears associated with mass migration are logical and justifiable.

“Local communities are sometimes afraid that the newly arrived will disturb the established order, will ‘steal’ something they have long laboured to build up,” Francis said in a Mass celebrated with migrants and refugees living in Rome Sunday. “These fears are legitimate, based on doubts that are fully comprehensible from a human point of view.”

Whereas it is normal to experience these fears, the Pope said in his homily, it may be wrong to let them control our actions.

Of course we shouldn’t let our fears control our actions. But we also shouldn’t ignore legitimate fears and act as if they don’t exist, and surrender our rights to defend ourselves and the ones we love.

Sadly, this pope has had a bad habit of opining on matters that are beyond his expertise, and at the very least concerning which faithful Christians can have varying perspectives without imperiling their souls. Eager leftists have jumped on these pronouncements to guilt-shame Catholics into believing that they must agree with the Pope on these matters. No. We. Don’t.

The pontiff is hopefully learning from this walkback that he needs to be a bit more humble, and that he should consider whether his sometimes less than fully informed opinions on matters such as mass migration are helpful.

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Laura Ingraham Uniquely Details Deportations, Criminal Records of Denver Drug Bust Suspects

On Friday’s Ingraham Angle, host Laura Ingraham again devoted much of her program to illegal immigration and the DACA (Deferred Action for Child Arrivals) program. In the process, she detailed the prior arrest and immigration records of five of the six men who are hardly children who were arrested last week in Colorado for running a heroin distribution ring. She indicated that no other media outlet had even asked authorities about these details until her program did.

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Monday Off-Topic (Moderated) Open Thread (011518)

Filed under: Lucid Links — Tom @ 6:00 am

This open thread is meant for commenters to post on items either briefly noted below (if any) or otherwise not covered at this blog. Rules are here.

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Positivity: Martin Luther King

Filed under: Positivity — Tom @ 5:55 am

Related“How MLK’s Faith Influenced His Public Life.”

Also: Dr. Ben Carson’s 2014 tweet“As we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. let us pay more attention to the content of one’s character than the color of one’s skin.”

From the Nobel Peace Prize’s biography:

Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr., but later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating from high school at the age of fifteen; he received the B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College, a distinguished Negro institution of Atlanta from which both his father and grandfather had graduated. After three years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class, he was awarded the B.D. in 1951. With a fellowship won at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston he met and married Coretta Scott, a young woman of uncommon intellectual and artistic attainments. Two sons and two daughters were born into the family.

In 1954, Martin Luther King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights for members of his race, King was, by this time, a member of the executive committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the leading organization of its kind in the nation. He was ready, then, early in December, 1955, to accept the leadership of the first great Negro nonviolent demonstration of contemporary times in the United States, the bus boycott described by Gunnar Jahn in his presentation speech in honor of the laureate. The boycott lasted 382 days. On December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court of the United States had declared unconstitutional the laws requiring segregation on buses, Negroes and whites rode the buses as equals. During these days of boycott, King was arrested, his home was bombed, he was subjected to personal abuse, but at the same time he emerged as a Negro leader of the first rank.

In 1957 he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization formed to provide new leadership for the now burgeoning civil rights movement. The ideals for this organization he took from Christianity; its operational techniques from Gandhi. In the eleven-year period between 1957 and 1968, King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times, appearing wherever there was injustice, protest, and action; and meanwhile he wrote five books as well as numerous articles. In these years, he led a massive protest in Birmingham, Alabama, that caught the attention of the entire world, providing what he called a coalition of conscience. and inspiring his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, a manifesto of the Negro revolution; he planned the drives in Alabama for the registration of Negroes as voters; he directed the peaceful march on Washington, D.C., of 250,000 people to whom he delivered his address, “l Have a Dream”, he conferred with President John F. Kennedy and campaigned for President Lyndon B. Johnson; he was arrested upwards of twenty times and assaulted at least four times; he was awarded five honorary degrees; was named Man of the Year by Time magazine in 1963; and became not only the symbolic leader of American blacks but also a world figure.

At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr., was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement.

On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated.

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